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I'm trying to find a copy of 6.20 to run a diff on a client's Drupal install. I believe there's been changes to core.

How can I get version 6.20? Additionally, how can I download any older Drupal versions?

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5 Answers 5

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You can get Drupal 6.20 from the Drupal 6.20 released page.

You can also view a list of all current and previous releases on the Releases for Drupal core page, complete with download links. It goes all the way back to Drupal 4.2.0, which I'm now off to install to see what happens!

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    For further fun times, you can also download Drupal 2 and Drupal 3 from here - uploaded by dries himself :-)
    – Chapabu
    Apr 26, 2012 at 15:34
  • @Chapabu Wow! Now if we could only find Drupal v1 ;)
    – Clive
    Apr 26, 2012 at 15:48
  • I've not been able to find Drupal 1.0, but I found a CVS log here
    – Chapabu
    Apr 26, 2012 at 15:55
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    You mean, uploaded by Kjartan himself :) but yeah.
    – user49
    May 1, 2012 at 19:51
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I know you've already got it answered... but Git wasn't mentioned.

git clone http://git.drupal.org/project/drupal.git target_directory
cd target_directory
git checkout -b local 6.20

Good option if you just want to cut to the chase and "git" it. Best paired with "Drush", to download, update, backup etc from the command line.

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My answer is for the question: Where can I locate source code of Drupal 1.0 or earlier version?

Just get the current code from github. The commit msg from commit 6e88265b1f5fd984c7bff8207e214982ec260e3e reads - added drupal 1.00 final.

So it seems it's a good bet that this commit holds the drupal 1.0 code.

Even earlier: the second commit is tagged with start. So try to check that out.

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I had a presentation about History of Drupal and as part of it I pushed historical releases of Drupal on github

Browse Drupal source code by version:

Drupal 1.0

Drupal 2.0

Drupal 3.0

Drupal 4.0

Drupal 4.1

Drupal 4.2

Drupal 4.3

Drupal 4.4

Drupal 4.5

Drupal 4.6

Drupal 4.7

Drupal 5.0

Drupal 6.0

Download Drupal (tar.gz) per version:

Drupal 1.0

Drupal 2.0

Drupal 3.0

Drupal 4.0

Drupal 4.1

Drupal 4.2

Drupal 4.3

Drupal 4.4

Drupal 4.5

Drupal 4.6

Drupal 4.7

Drupal 5.0

Drupal 6.0

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My best bet (to answer "Where can I locate source code of Drupal 1.0 or earlier version?", marked as a duplicate of this question here) would be to try to use the contact form on Drupal.org for user/1 ... Here is part of what's included in that special profile:

Bio:

  • Drupal founder and project lead
  • ...

As the founder of Drupal, this user must have had a pretty early version of (what today is called) Drupal. So that user may have some types of backups hanging around from those very early (pre Drupal 1.0) days. For example something that at that time was used also for running (eg) www.drop.org.

Have a look at the video about History of Drupal aka from Drop 1 0 to Drupal 8 0, and pay special attention to what is shown around 5:02 in it where you can see a timestamp of Dec 29, 2000 at 11:00:56 GMT, together with the historical words "I think I'll baptize the engine 'drupal' ...". If you continue a bit further in that video, you'll notice Jan 15, 2001 as the release date of Drupal 1.0 (with a screenprint of how that looked like around 6:45).

PS: I assume everybody knows the story that "Drupal" is the English/American pronunciation of the Dutch (Flemish) word "Druppel", whereas Druppel is the Dutch (Flemish) word for Drop. And also that long time this very same user wanted to register domain name dorp.org (the Dutch (Flemish) for "village"). But made a typo and registered drop.org instead ... All this to explain why I suggest having a look at (the arcive.org-version of) www.drop.org also ...

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    Could you expand on how this answers the question of where to get old versions of Drupal from? Are you suggesting that people should contact the admin user of Drupal.org through the contact form for that information or something?
    – Clive
    Mar 15, 2016 at 11:56
  • @Clive: better like so? Mar 15, 2016 at 12:12

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